Monday, March 29, 2010

CRIME FICTION ALPHABET: X IS FOR XENAKIS


My contribution to this week's Crime Fiction Alphabet meme hosted at Kerrie's Mysteries in Paradise is a little bit different, because rules are there to be bent, altered and even squeezed a little.
X is for Xenakis.
Many people whose everyday jobs bring them into close contact with crime turn to writing crime fiction. Lawyers Michael Genelin and Gianrico Carofiglio, forensic anthropologist Kathy Reich and Pinkerton detective Dashiell Hammett immediately spring to mind.
Dr Sappho Xenakis is the Marie Curie Intra European Fellow 2009-2011 at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, and has also held a postdoctoral fellowship at the LSE. Her special interests are organised crime, corruption and police practices.
Later in the year her book entitled The Politics of Organised Crime: Theory and Practice is being published by Routledge, and she has also co-edited Crime and Punishment in Contemporary Greece. Not books for the everyday reader but something that academic libraries would be interested in purchasing.
During the Greek riots in December 2008 she was interviewed on BBC Newsnight, Al Jazeera, BBC World News, and the BBC World Service.
Dr Xenakis might well transfer her considerable expertise into writing crime fiction, as she has both the good looks and intelligence to be a very marketable author.

I have to confess an interest as my mother's youngest brother is the grandfather of Dr Xenakis.

7 Comments:

Blogger Margot Kinberg said...

Norman- This sounds like a very interesting author, and an interesting book. And you're related to her? That's even better :). Thanks for sharing this with us.

7:56 AM  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

Thanks Margot. My mother was one of eleven children which gave me a good start in assembling relatives. ;0)

10:47 AM  
Blogger Maxine said...

Yes, fascinating, Norman. My paternal grandfather was one of eight and my maternal grandmother one of five, but that's all I know. In my paternal grandfather's case, he was the only male. He had two sons. One of those (my dad) had four daughters. The other son remained childless. The "Clarke" line seems to stop with me, therefore (as I am the only one of my sisters who keeps her own name, but my own daughters have their father's name.) In fact my husband's name is also due to die out, as he has one sister (two sons and a daughter) who changed her name upon marriage, and my husband has three daughters, all with his name, but doubtless they won't be passing it on to any offspring they may have. Sorry to be so off-topic, was just feeling a bit maudlin for times gone by!

1:21 PM  
Blogger Bernadette in Australia said...

LOL Norman, my paternal grandmother was one of 11 and my maternal grandmother one of 12 so I know what you mean about having a good start in assembling relatives from all walks of life :)

Good X contribution too, it's probably my inner cynic talking but I imagine a book about those three subjects will be a large tome indeed!

3:05 PM  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

Thanks Maxine and Bernadette.
I would have to get out my family tree [out of reach in my present condition at the moment] to see the full extent of the very large families of my grandparent's generation. Of course my parent's generation had much smaller families [ I am an only child as are several of my cousins], because the men were away for many years during the war.

3:49 PM  
Blogger Philip said...

Very, very interesting indeed, Norman. Thank you. I shall alert friends in Criminology to the forthcoming The Politics of Organized Crime, and I may look at myself. Perhaps at some time we might see from pen The Organized Crime of Politics.:-)

6:16 AM  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

Thanks Philip.
Your title is very apt as we face an election here in the UK. Ever since Brown removed Blair in what was in effect a coup d'etat in which an unelected party leader became an unelected prime minister I have been certain he would win the election.
Now it seems the polls are reflecting what I thought was obvious. It is virtually impossible in what has become a corporate state with a rotten borough electoral system for the opposition to remove the ruling party, especially when that party is ruled by a ruthless Peron style leader.

6:48 AM  

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