Tuesday, February 13, 2007

TO FRESH WOODS

I have started a new relationship. It is very difficult and I am nervous as to how I will get on with a new significant other. When you have been in a close personal relationship for a time you know everything about the other person there is to know.
You know their little bad habits, what they like to eat and even what they like to read. The new person is a stranger in your life and it is very frightening, but sometimes you just have to move on......

Yes I have finished reading all the Salvo Montalbano books that have been translated into English, and have begun to read an Erik Winter book by Ake Edwardson.

Will Erik be as big a part of my life as Salvo?

From the cover he does like jazz, but will it be my kind of jazz, Armstrong, Basie, Hawkins, Spanier and Goodman or more modern stuff ?
The journey of discovery begins.........

5 Comments:

Blogger Peter said...

Hmm, and if you feel a need for a little adventure on the side, you might sneak off and read Jean-Claude Izzo's Marseilles trilogy. The protagonist, Fabio Montale, has some interesting musical tastes: http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/2006/10/jean-claude-izzos-total-chaos-music.html, http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/2006/11/lhistoire-du-polar-marseillais-crime.html

Your remarks about your own musical tastes and Erik Winter's reminded me of one thing that bugs me about Ian Rankin's John Rebus. I don't begrudge Rebus his love of the Rolling Stones, but the Stones' popularity is so widespread that a taste for their music is not unusual enough to serve as a distinctive character marker. Maybe that's supposed to be part of Rebus' everyman charm. It won't work for me until Rankin can tell me why Reubus' reaction to the Stones is different enough from yours or mine to hold my interest.

The same goes for Ken Bruen's protagonists. Rock and roll is so mainstream these days that it's tough for an author to use it as a mark of distinctiveness, despair or much of anything, really. It's as banal as using brand names to set the tone of a place and time.

===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
"Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home"
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

4:09 PM  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

So far in Sun and Shadow the musical medley consists of Bruce Springsteen, "death metal" and Charlie Haden, the jazz double bassist.
I have never been able to take the Rolling Stones seriously since my dear Mother reprimanded Mike Jagger about 30 years ago. He was a customer in my parents shop in the Kings Road, Chelsea. He was already a huge star and asked my Mother if there was a cheaper version of some item. "Mr Jagger, with all the money you make I would have thought you would be asking for a more expensive item" was the put down. Jagger paid and left and was a good boy in future visits.
I will certainly take a look at the Marseilles Trilogy as your posts have made them seem very promising.
My own collection of music CD's would probably have the psychiatrists pondering my thought processes. They range from King Oliver to Garth Brooks via Mozart, Verdi and Puccini, with a touch Scott Joplin and Aaron Copland thrown in. It probably shows that I can't make up my mind what music I like, or that I like it all.

12:45 PM  
Blogger Peter said...

Your comments got me thinking about this vital matter, and I've posted a comment on my blog; go visit.

In recent days, I've listened to both Horowitz and Rubenstein playing Beethoven sonatas (I think I like Horowitz a bit better), Paco de Lucia, and the great Brazilian singer Elizeth Cardoso. I love sitting around my regular secondhand bookshop and listening to the pop music, jazz, Balinese gamelan and unclassifiable world music the owners and employees play.

I don't think psychiatrists would find much of interest in that. But I do think that people have more varied tastes than some authors like to imagine. That's one reason I'm wary of music as a character marker, especially when it's music that everyone listens to.

Between rock stars and gangsters, you and your family have had brushes with an interesting group of greats and near-greats.

3:33 PM  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

I am on my way over to Detectives beyond Borders now to read your post.
Musical taste does vary, I see that my wife has among her Buddhist chants, Gregorian chants, Jan Garbarek,Native American music, Medieval/Early music, and Aarvo Parte, a single CD by Randy Travis!

4:08 AM  
Blogger Peter said...

Country music is God's way of reminding us we do not live in a perfect world.
===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
"Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home"
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

2:46 PM  

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